Pittsburgh Project

Pictured from left to right: Dr. Bopaya Bidanda (Swanson); Ms. Kristy Bronder (Katz);
Dr. John C. Camillus (Katz); Dr. John Wallace (School of Social Work) 

Background

While Pittsburgh has been given recent accolades for being one of the “most livable” cities in the nation, this is not the case for all of its citizens.  Our partner on this project, Dr. John Wallace (Pitt’s School of Social Work) has graciously provided us with the following invaluable information that demonstrates why the DC HEaRT project has invested in Homewood and why the opportunity for growth in this community is limitless. 

In 2015, a report from the Center on Race & Social Problems titled “Pittsburgh’s Racial Demographics 2015: Differences and Disparities” identifies some alarming statistics. 

As can be seen in the following graphics, African Americans’ income is less than 50% of Whites, the unemployment rate is 2.5 times that of Whites, and African Americans in Pittsburgh are significantly less likely to own their homes:


 






In addition to these staggering statistics, in a 2008 study, Pittsburgh was shown to have the highest rate of poverty (over 60%) for African Americans under the age of 5 living in poverty in comparison to 40 of the largest cities in the country:
 



When looking specifically at Homewood, while the neighborhood is only 1 square mile, it has 6,602 residents, 96% of whom are African American.  Of the total residents, 2,129 make up children and youth between the ages of 0-21 years.  The chart below highlights the conditions of the families living in Homewood:
 



In our conversations with Dr. Wallace, we agreed that one of the significant ways that we can work to improve the living conditions of the families in Homewood was to address the problem of food access and insecurity.  When surveyed, residents admitted the following:

30% (often or sometimes) - “We couldn’t afford to eat balanced meals”
40% (often or sometimes) - “The food that we bought just didn’t last, and we didn’t have money to get more”
48% (often or sometimes) - “We worried whether our food would run out before we got money to buy more.”

In order to tackle this problem, we worked with Dr. Wallace to find a way that direct current (DC) technology could be applied alongside additional green energy technologies to provide this community with a unique structure that could grow healthy and accessible food all-year round. 

In addition, the use of DC technology can also be applied to address another issue with Homewood residents, the high cost of utilities.  By using DC as the source of power in the bioshelter, we are able to monitor and research how effective DC power can be in the structure and how these savings can make a powerful case for our next project in Homewood, retrofitting the adjacent triplex building with DC-AC power.  Our hope is to continue to demonstrate that DC power can help lower the cost of utilities and in turn, prove that the investment in DC power can ultimately help families in need.
 

SCOPE OF WORK

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LATEST NEWS

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Please check out this exclusive video that shows the bio-shelter being built from the ground up!